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image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

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image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

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image: Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

By | August 22, 2013

Layer-by-layer manufacturing techniques could help re-make human body parts, or produce entirely new biocompatible machines.

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image: Engineered Hearts Beat

Engineered Hearts Beat

By | August 15, 2013

Human stem cells take up residence in mouse hearts stripped of their own components, restoring some of the organs’ function.

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image: Lab-Grown Ear

Lab-Grown Ear

By | August 1, 2013

Scientists used a titanium wire framework to help ears made from collagen and sheep cartilage cells maintain their shape.

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image: Cellular Pegs-in-Holes

Cellular Pegs-in-Holes

By | August 1, 2013

Cell-containing hydrogel shapes fit into a template to create an artificial tissue environment.

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image: Lab-grown Kidneys Work in Rats

Lab-grown Kidneys Work in Rats

By | April 17, 2013

Bioengineered kidneys transplanted into rats filter blood and produce urine, an achievement that points the way to replacement kidneys for humans.

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image: Printing 3-D Synthetic Tissues

Printing 3-D Synthetic Tissues

By | April 4, 2013

A 3-D printer lays liquid droplets into tissue-like materials that can fold automatically and carry currents.

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image: The Golden Goose Is Awarded

The Golden Goose Is Awarded

By | September 12, 2012

Researchers are given a prize for high-impact science that began with an unusual or seemingly frivolous study.

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image: Replacement Parts

Replacement Parts

By | August 1, 2012

To cope with a growing shortage of hearts, livers, and lungs suitable for transplant, some scientists are genetically engineering pigs, while others are growing organs in the lab.

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