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image: The Benefits of Barcoding

The Benefits of Barcoding

By | March 1, 2014

Watch DNA barcoder Mehrdad Hajibabaei from the University of Guelph describe the technology’s potential.

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image: A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

By | February 26, 2014

Scientists map the partial proteome of a common lactic acid bacterium.

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image: New Species of Randy Marsupials Discovered

New Species of Randy Marsupials Discovered

By | February 21, 2014

Researchers have identified three new Australian marsupial species, males of which fornicate until they keel over.

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image: How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers reveal the molecular mechanisms of Streptomyces platensis’s defense from its own antibiotics, which inhibit fatty acid synthesis in other microbes.

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image: Huge Mystery Jellyfish Washes Ashore

Huge Mystery Jellyfish Washes Ashore

By | February 7, 2014

Found by a family combing a beach in Tasmania, the giant invertebrate is new to science.

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image: Microbial Smog

Microbial Smog

By | February 3, 2014

Some 1,300 species of microbes, including some associated with allergies and lung disease, are adrift in Beijing’s thick smog.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #4

The Scientist on The Pulse #4

By | February 3, 2014

This week, Kerry Grens talks about a new study predicting Midwest earthquakes in the future, a new species of river dolphin, and the biomechanics of flying snakes.

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image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

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image: Tenacious Termites

Tenacious Termites

By | February 1, 2014

Formosan subterranean termites evade deadly pathogens by building nests lined with their own feces.

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image: The Necrobiome

The Necrobiome

By | February 1, 2014

Next-generation sequencing of the bacterial assemblages that inhabit a corpse throughout decomposition improve time-of-death estimates.

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