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image: Image of the Day: In the Wild 

Image of the Day: In the Wild 

By | January 16, 2017

Scientists observe a new species of seadragon (Phyllopteryx dewysea) for the first time. 

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image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

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image: Image of the Day: Pretty in Pink

Image of the Day: Pretty in Pink

By | January 12, 2017

Females of a newly discovered katydid species (Eulophophyllum kirki) have a unique pink hue.

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image: Adaptation, Island Style

Adaptation, Island Style

By | January 3, 2017

Anole lizards inhabiting the Caribbean islands display some of the key principles of evolution.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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image: Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

By | December 29, 2016

Audio recordings of bats hashing out disputes reveals that their calls are laden with information about identity and intent.

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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image: New Species of 2016

New Species of 2016

By | December 16, 2016

From a new Tyrannosaurus and many other dinosaurs to all of the living species named this year, researchers continue to chip away at the planet’s unknown biodiversity.

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