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image: Image of the Day: Jungle Jedi

Image of the Day: Jungle Jedi

By | January 23, 2017

The newly identified Skywalker gibbon (Hoolock tianxing) is threatened with extinction, along with roughly 60 percent of primate species worldwide.

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: Image of the Day: Trump Bug

Image of the Day: Trump Bug

By | January 19, 2017

Inspired by President-elect Donald Trump's signature hairdo, a biologist named a new species of moth with yellowish-white scales on its head Neopalpa donaldtrumpi.

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image: Image of the Day: In the Wild 

Image of the Day: In the Wild 

By | January 16, 2017

Scientists observe a new species of seadragon (Phyllopteryx dewysea) for the first time. 

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image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

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image: Image of the Day: Pretty in Pink

Image of the Day: Pretty in Pink

By | January 12, 2017

Females of a newly discovered katydid species (Eulophophyllum kirki) have a unique pink hue.

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image: Adaptation, Island Style

Adaptation, Island Style

By | January 3, 2017

Anole lizards inhabiting the Caribbean islands display some of the key principles of evolution.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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