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image: Week in Review: May 5–9

Week in Review: May 5–9

By | May 9, 2014

Synthetic base pairs replicated in vivo; cardiac stem cells questioned; miniature neurotransmissions and synaptic development; neurogenesis and memory loss; STAP saga continues

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image: Exercise Can Erase Memories

Exercise Can Erase Memories

By | May 8, 2014

Running causes rodents to forget their fears in part because of increased hippocampal neurogenesis, a study shows.

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image: Augmenting the Genetic Alphabet

Augmenting the Genetic Alphabet

By | May 7, 2014

For the first time, synthetic DNA base pairs are replicated within living bacteria.

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image: IDing Cancer with 3-D Genomics

IDing Cancer with 3-D Genomics

By | May 7, 2014

In a proof-of-principle study, scientists show that the three-dimensional shape of a cancer cell genome can reliably classify subtypes of human leukemia.

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image: Half Genes, Half Environment

Half Genes, Half Environment

By | May 5, 2014

Examining more than 20 years of Swedish birth records, researchers determine that autism risk is influenced equally by genetic and environmental factors.

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image: Week in Review: April 28–May 2

Week in Review: April 28–May 2

By | May 2, 2014

Male scientists stress mice out; using SCNT to reprogram adult cells; acetate can reach mouse brain, reduce appetite; WHO sounds “post-antibiotic era” alarm

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image: Competition for CRISPR Commercialization

Competition for CRISPR Commercialization

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers stake their proprietary claim on the genome-editing technique.

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image: Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera

By | May 1, 2014

Selected Images of the Day from www.the-scientist.com

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: Sharing the Wealth

Sharing the Wealth

By | May 1, 2014

From research results to electronic health records, biomedical data are becoming increasingly accessible. How can scientists best capitalize on the information deluge?

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