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image: Small Packages

Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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image: A Vaulted Mystery

A Vaulted Mystery

By | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

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image: Next Generation: See-through Mice

Next Generation: See-through Mice

By | July 31, 2014

An improved tissue-clearing technique makes whole animals transparent.

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image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

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image: Week in Review: July 14–18

Week in Review: July 14–18

By | July 18, 2014

Converting heart muscle to pacemaker cells in pigs; alternative splicing and the human proteome; questioning a reported yogurt mold-illness link; H. pylori swiftly find mouse stomach injuries

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image: Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

By | July 10, 2014

Olfactory receptors in the skin may help repair damaged tissue, a study shows.

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image: Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

By | July 3, 2014

Scientists show how cell stress both prevents and promotes cell suicide in a study that’s equally divisive.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Interactome Analysis

Interactome Analysis

By | June 17, 2014

Study examines tissue-specific protein interactions linked to hereditary diseases.

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image: Beneficial Brew

Beneficial Brew

By | June 1, 2014

Drinking green tea appears to boost the activity of DNA repair enzymes.

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