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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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image: Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

By | January 30, 2017

Scientists discover the alien-like Aethiocarenus burmanicus, a 100 million-year old insect with a triangular head and bulging eyes.

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image: Image of the Day: Little Hermits

Image of the Day: Little Hermits

By | January 27, 2017

This newly discovered species of hermit crab, Pylopaguropsis mollymullerae, uses its massive right pincer to push itself along while crawling.

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image: Image of the Day: Giant Otters

Image of the Day: Giant Otters

By | January 24, 2017

Paleontologists uncover a nearly complete cranium of Siamogale melilutra, a 6.24 million-year-old otter species that was as large as some modern wolf species.

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image: Image of the Day: Jungle Jedi

Image of the Day: Jungle Jedi

By | January 23, 2017

The newly identified Skywalker gibbon (Hoolock tianxing) is threatened with extinction, along with roughly 60 percent of primate species worldwide.

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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