The Scientist

» new species, developmental biology and ecology

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.


image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.


image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: <em>Triceratops</em> Kin Found

Triceratops Kin Found

By | July 9, 2015

Researchers unearth an evolutionary cousin of the iconic three-horned dinosaur, and the new species is one of the oldest known members of the taxonomic family.


image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.


image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century


image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.


image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

By | June 8, 2015

Dubbed “Hellboy,” the triceratops relative sports a bevy of horns on its crested cranium.


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