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image: Image of the Day: Trump Bug

Image of the Day: Trump Bug

By | January 19, 2017

Inspired by President-elect Donald Trump's signature hairdo, a biologist named a new species of moth with yellowish-white scales on its head Neopalpa donaldtrumpi.

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image: Image of the Day: In the Wild 

Image of the Day: In the Wild 

By | January 16, 2017

Scientists observe a new species of seadragon (Phyllopteryx dewysea) for the first time. 

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image: Image of the Day: Pretty in Pink

Image of the Day: Pretty in Pink

By | January 12, 2017

Females of a newly discovered katydid species (Eulophophyllum kirki) have a unique pink hue.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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image: New Species of 2016

New Species of 2016

By | December 16, 2016

From a new Tyrannosaurus and many other dinosaurs to all of the living species named this year, researchers continue to chip away at the planet’s unknown biodiversity.

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image: Slideshow: New Species of 2016

Slideshow: New Species of 2016

By | December 16, 2016

A look at some of the species named this year

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image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

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image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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