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image: Winged Dino Found?

Winged Dino Found?

By | May 1, 2015

Researchers describe a small species that may have soared through Jurassic skies on membranous wings like those of bats and flying squirrels.

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image: <em>T. rex</em>’s Vegetarian Cousin

T. rex’s Vegetarian Cousin

By | April 28, 2015

Researchers discover a considerably less ferocious branch of the family tree that includes one of the most fearsome dinosaurs to ever walk the Earth.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Unique Frog Breeding

Unique Frog Breeding

By | January 5, 2015

A newly described amphibian species engages in internal fertilizations and gives birth to tadpoles.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: New Species Galore

New Species Galore

By | December 27, 2014

A look back at the latest microbes, plants, and animals to have secured a spot in science’s known tree of life in 2014

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

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