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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: <em>Triceratops</em> Kin Found

Triceratops Kin Found

By | July 9, 2015

Researchers unearth an evolutionary cousin of the iconic three-horned dinosaur, and the new species is one of the oldest known members of the taxonomic family.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

By | June 8, 2015

Dubbed “Hellboy,” the triceratops relative sports a bevy of horns on its crested cranium.

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image: A New Human Ancestor?

A New Human Ancestor?

By | May 28, 2015

Researchers in Ethiopia unearth a previously unknown species of hominin, which roamed Africa at the same time as “Lucy.”

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image: Celebrating New Species

Celebrating New Species

By | May 21, 2015

An international panel of scientists selects the 10 most interesting organisms discovered last year.

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image: SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2015

SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2015

By | May 21, 2015

A look at State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry scientists’ picks

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