The Scientist

» new species and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2015

SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2015

By | May 21, 2015

A look at State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry scientists’ picks

0 Comments

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

0 Comments

image: Winged Dino Found?

Winged Dino Found?

By | May 1, 2015

Researchers describe a small species that may have soared through Jurassic skies on membranous wings like those of bats and flying squirrels.

0 Comments

image: <em>T. rex</em>’s Vegetarian Cousin

T. rex’s Vegetarian Cousin

By | April 28, 2015

Researchers discover a considerably less ferocious branch of the family tree that includes one of the most fearsome dinosaurs to ever walk the Earth.

1 Comment

image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

0 Comments

image: Unique Frog Breeding

Unique Frog Breeding

By | January 5, 2015

A newly described amphibian species engages in internal fertilizations and gives birth to tadpoles.

0 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  4. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
AAAS