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image: Venter's New Venture

Venter's New Venture

By | March 5, 2014

The genomics pioneer is starting a new company that aims to tackle the mysteries of human aging.

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A butterfly’s varied disguises are controlled by variants of a single gene, partially confirming—and refuting—a decades-old hypothesis.

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image: More Mutations in Girls with Autism

More Mutations in Girls with Autism

By | March 4, 2014

A greater number of genetic mutations among autistic girls, compared to their male counterparts, suggests that the female brain can better handle such variations.  

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Keys to the Minibar

Keys to the Minibar

By | March 1, 2014

Degraded DNA from museum specimens, scat, and other sources has thwarted barcoding efforts, but researchers are filling in the gaps with mini-versions of characteristic genomic stretches.

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image: The Benefits of Barcoding

The Benefits of Barcoding

By | March 1, 2014

Watch DNA barcoder Mehrdad Hajibabaei from the University of Guelph describe the technology’s potential.

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image: Dad’s Contribution

Dad’s Contribution

By | February 28, 2014

Older fathers may have children with higher risk of psychiatric disorders, according to a study.

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image: Week in Review: February 24–28

Week in Review: February 24–28

By | February 28, 2014

New PLOS data sharing rules; mouse cortical connectome published; reprogramming astrocytes into neurons and fibroblasts into hepatocytes

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image: Plants Without Plastid Genomes

Plants Without Plastid Genomes

By | February 28, 2014

Two independent teams point to different plants that may have lost their plastid genomes.

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image: For Whom the Biomarkers Toll?

For Whom the Biomarkers Toll?

By | February 27, 2014

Study finds that a handful of biological indicators can predict a healthy person’s risk of dying within five years.

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