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image: Neuron Preservers

Neuron Preservers

By | January 1, 2013

Unlike epithelial cells, neurons respond to herpes infection through autophagy, rather than by releasing inflammatory factors.

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image: Philip Low: Sleep Analyzer

Philip Low: Sleep Analyzer

By | January 1, 2013

Founder, Chairman, and CEO, NeuroVigil, Age: 33

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image: Spider Sculpts Fake Spider

Spider Sculpts Fake Spider

By | December 19, 2012

A putative new species of spider found in the Peruvian Amazon uses forest debris to weave sculptures that resemble a giant spider into its web.

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image: 2012’s Noteworthy Species

2012’s Noteworthy Species

By | December 18, 2012

A roundup of species that made their scientific debut in 2012, and a few that said goodbye as well

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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image: Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

By , , and | December 6, 2012

Insulin, long recognized as a primary regulator of blood glucose, is now also understood to play key roles in neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, and neurotrophism.

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image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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image: Why Older People Get Scammed

Why Older People Get Scammed

By | December 4, 2012

Elderly people are worse at spotting untrustworthy faces, possibly due to decreased activity in the brain region associated with such perceptions.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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