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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: <em>Triceratops</em> Kin Found

Triceratops Kin Found

By | July 9, 2015

Researchers unearth an evolutionary cousin of the iconic three-horned dinosaur, and the new species is one of the oldest known members of the taxonomic family.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

By | June 8, 2015

Dubbed “Hellboy,” the triceratops relative sports a bevy of horns on its crested cranium.

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image: A New Human Ancestor?

A New Human Ancestor?

By | May 28, 2015

Researchers in Ethiopia unearth a previously unknown species of hominin, which roamed Africa at the same time as “Lucy.”

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image: Celebrating New Species

Celebrating New Species

By | May 21, 2015

An international panel of scientists selects the 10 most interesting organisms discovered last year.

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image: SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2015

SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2015

By | May 21, 2015

A look at State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry scientists’ picks

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