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image: Celebrating New Species

Celebrating New Species

By | May 21, 2015

An international panel of scientists selects the 10 most interesting organisms discovered last year.

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image: SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2015

SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2015

By | May 21, 2015

A look at State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry scientists’ picks

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Winged Dino Found?

Winged Dino Found?

By | May 1, 2015

Researchers describe a small species that may have soared through Jurassic skies on membranous wings like those of bats and flying squirrels.

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image: <em>T. rex</em>’s Vegetarian Cousin

T. rex’s Vegetarian Cousin

By | April 28, 2015

Researchers discover a considerably less ferocious branch of the family tree that includes one of the most fearsome dinosaurs to ever walk the Earth.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Unique Frog Breeding

Unique Frog Breeding

By | January 5, 2015

A newly described amphibian species engages in internal fertilizations and gives birth to tadpoles.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: New Species Galore

New Species Galore

By | December 27, 2014

A look back at the latest microbes, plants, and animals to have secured a spot in science’s known tree of life in 2014

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