The Scientist

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image: Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

By | December 1, 2012

In the introduction to his latest book, renowned naturalist George Schaller describes the evolving role of the field biologist through the lens of his experiences with Himalayan wildlife.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

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image: Playing the Field

Playing the Field

By | December 1, 2012

The role of field biologists is changing as conservation biology evolves and ecological challenges mount.

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image: Polly Wanna Genome?

Polly Wanna Genome?

By | December 1, 2012

Puerto Rican businesses and residents come together to support the genomic sequencing of the island’s only native parrot species, hoping to help protect the endangered bird.

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image: Searching for Snails

Searching for Snails

By | December 1, 2012

A graduate student rediscovers a snail species officially declared extinct in 2000.

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image: Waking Cancer Cells

Waking Cancer Cells

By | December 1, 2012

A protein called Coco rouses dormant breast cancer cells in the lung.

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image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.

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image: Architecture Reveals Genome’s Secrets

Architecture Reveals Genome’s Secrets

By | November 25, 2012

Three-dimensional genome maps are leading to a deeper understanding of how the genome’s form influences its function.

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image: Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Dogs

Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Dogs

By | November 20, 2012

A transplant of cells from the lining of the nose helps dogs with spinal injuries walk again.

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