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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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image: Study: Human Life Span Maxed Out

Study: Human Life Span Maxed Out

By | October 6, 2016

Scientists argue that current medical advances cannot crack Homo sapiens’s natural age limit.

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image: Evidence Lacking for Brain-Training Products

Evidence Lacking for Brain-Training Products

By | October 4, 2016

A literature review finds little evidence that commercial brain-training games can improve everyday cognitive performance, citing methodological shortcomings.

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image: Early-Life Stress Affects Telomeres Later

Early-Life Stress Affects Telomeres Later

By | October 3, 2016

An accumulation of stressful events in childhood is associated with shorter telomeres as a person ages, researchers report. 

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