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image: Compound Confounds <em>C. elegans</em> Aging Research

Compound Confounds C. elegans Aging Research

By | February 22, 2016

A drug commonly used in experiments on the model organism can skew the results of aging studies, researchers show.

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image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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image: Slowing Aging

Slowing Aging

By | February 5, 2016

The removal of senescent cells in mice leads to an increased lifespan and later onset of age-linked diseases, scientists show.

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image: Circadian Clock and Aging

Circadian Clock and Aging

By | February 3, 2016

Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

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image: Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

By | February 3, 2016

Signs of getting older are less common among rodents with ramped-up ghrelin production.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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