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image: Mitochondrial Activity Predicts Fish Life Span?

Mitochondrial Activity Predicts Fish Life Span?

By | February 25, 2016

Scientists identify an inverse relationship between longevity in killifish and the expression of genes related to cellular respiration.

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image: Compound Confounds <em>C. elegans</em> Aging Research

Compound Confounds C. elegans Aging Research

By | February 22, 2016

A drug commonly used in experiments on the model organism can skew the results of aging studies, researchers show.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

By | February 17, 2016

What does blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging actually tell us about brain activity? 

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image: More Mini Brains

More Mini Brains

By | February 17, 2016

Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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image: Slowing Aging

Slowing Aging

By | February 5, 2016

The removal of senescent cells in mice leads to an increased lifespan and later onset of age-linked diseases, scientists show.

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image: Circadian Clock and Aging

Circadian Clock and Aging

By | February 3, 2016

Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

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image: Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

By | February 3, 2016

Signs of getting older are less common among rodents with ramped-up ghrelin production.

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image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.

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