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image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

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image: Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

By | February 25, 2016

The “just right” binding properties of a monoclonal antibody from an Ebolavirus survivor help it neutralize the virus.

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image: Mitochondrial Activity Predicts Fish Life Span?

Mitochondrial Activity Predicts Fish Life Span?

By | February 25, 2016

Scientists identify an inverse relationship between longevity in killifish and the expression of genes related to cellular respiration.

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image: Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

By | February 24, 2016

Compounds typically used to calm the immune system can prevent death from scorpion venom in mice, researchers report.

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image: Compound Confounds <em>C. elegans</em> Aging Research

Compound Confounds C. elegans Aging Research

By | February 22, 2016

A drug commonly used in experiments on the model organism can skew the results of aging studies, researchers show.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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image: Slowing Aging

Slowing Aging

By | February 5, 2016

The removal of senescent cells in mice leads to an increased lifespan and later onset of age-linked diseases, scientists show.

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image: Circadian Clock and Aging

Circadian Clock and Aging

By | February 3, 2016

Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

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image: Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

By | February 3, 2016

Signs of getting older are less common among rodents with ramped-up ghrelin production.

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