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image: Alphabet Announces Life Sciences

Alphabet Announces Life Sciences

By | August 24, 2015

Google’s parent company is launching a research-and-development project as a standalone firm.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Life on the Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Life on the Edge

By | August 1, 2015

In Chapter 4, “The quantum beat,” authors Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili rethink Newton’s apple from a quantum-biological perspective.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2015

Gods of the Morning, Hedonic Eating, A Beautiful Question, and Genomic Messages

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image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | August 1, 2015

Does a delicately orchestrated balance between quantum and classical physics distinguish living from nonliving things?

15 Comments

image: Delayed Turnover

Delayed Turnover

By | July 21, 2015

Aggregate-forming amyloid β proteins are replenished more slowly with age, and this may contribute to a person's risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

By | July 14, 2015

Calorie restriction in the organism extends lifespan, supporting a long-standing view that had been challenged by a study published last year.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Faith vs. Fact</em>

Book Excerpt from Faith vs. Fact

By | July 1, 2015

In Chapter 1, “The Problem,” author Jerry Coyne sets the historical stage for his suggestion that science and religion are not compatible and never will be.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes

5 Comments

image: Staying Active in the Lab

Staying Active in the Lab

By | July 1, 2015

Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.

8 Comments

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