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image: Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

By | February 3, 2016

Signs of getting older are less common among rodents with ramped-up ghrelin production.

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

9 Comments

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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AAUP Champion Dies

By | January 26, 2016

Jordan Kurland, associate general secretary of the American Association of University Professors, has passed away at age 87. 

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Speaking of Science 2015

Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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image: TS Picks: December 30, 2015

TS Picks: December 30, 2015

By | December 30, 2015

Overvaluing startups; undervaluing human research participants; curing aging?

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image: Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

By | December 23, 2015

As the rhythmic expression of many genes falls out of sync in older human brains, a subset of transcripts gain rhythmicity with age.

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image: Year in Review: Hot Topics

Year in Review: Hot Topics

By | December 21, 2015

In 2015, The Scientist dove deep into the latest research on aging, HIV, hearing, and obesity.

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