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image: Buying Cell-Culture Products

Buying Cell-Culture Products

By | March 1, 2013

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

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image: Crack Control

Crack Control

By | March 1, 2013

Nanoscale cracks in bone dissipate energy to protect against fracture, a process that appears to be regulated by the interaction of two proteins.

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image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

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image: Sleep Protection

Sleep Protection

By | March 1, 2013

Inducing certain brain patterns extends non-REM sleep in mice.

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image: Neurons Live Longer in New Brains

Neurons Live Longer in New Brains

By | February 25, 2013

Transplanting mouse neurons into rats allows the neurons to survive twice as long as they would in mice.

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image: Synthetic Peptide Fools Immune System

Synthetic Peptide Fools Immune System

By | February 21, 2013

Researchers have created a molecule that helps nanoparticles evade immune attack and could improve drug delivery.  

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image: Lucrative Prize for Life Scientists

Lucrative Prize for Life Scientists

By | February 21, 2013

Three Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are offering $3 million to scientists demonstrating excellence in biology and medical research.

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image: Mitochondria Versus Nucleus

Mitochondria Versus Nucleus

By | February 15, 2013

Disruptions in the interaction between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can lead to deficiencies in the mitochondrial energy-generating process, affecting fitness.

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image: Why Women’s Eggs Don’t Last

Why Women’s Eggs Don’t Last

By | February 13, 2013

As reproductive tissues age, DNA repair mechanisms become less efficient, causing genomic damage to accumulate.

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image: Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

By | February 7, 2013

Protein aggregates in the brains of some people with dementia or motor neuron disease have a surprising origin.

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