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image: Opinion: Aging, Not a Disease

Opinion: Aging, Not a Disease

By | December 23, 2016

A response to “Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease” 

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image: RNA Pathway Helps Keep Flies Alive

RNA Pathway Helps Keep Flies Alive

By | December 22, 2016

An anti-transposon pathway previously thought to function only in reproductive tissue also helps reduce harmful mutations in body cells of fruit flies.

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image: Study: Aging May Be Reversible In Mice

Study: Aging May Be Reversible In Mice

By | December 19, 2016

By tweaking four transcription factors that convert differentiated cells into pluripotent precursors, researchers report having reversed aging in mice. 

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image: Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

By | December 11, 2016

This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.

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Scientists present evidence of bacteria-driven mating in flagellate eukaryotes at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting.

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image: Controlled Splicing Extends Life Span in Roundworms

Controlled Splicing Extends Life Span in Roundworms

By | December 7, 2016

Increasing the expression of an RNA splicing factor mimics dietary restriction, prolonging life in nematodes. 

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image: “Celldance” Selections

“Celldance” Selections

By | December 5, 2016

Highlights from the American Society for Cell Biology’s 2016 video grant competition

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image: Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

By | December 2, 2016

The human lymph nodes and spleen maintain unique, compartmentalized sets of naive T cells well into old age.

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image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

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image: Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

By | December 1, 2016

Cells with the best traction on a substrate pull their neighbors toward firmer ground.

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