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» aging and developmental biology

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image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

image: A New Model of Yeast Aging

A New Model of Yeast Aging

By | November 23, 2011

New findings challenge long-held views about the mechanism yeast cells use to live forever.

6 Comments

image: Prenatal Stress Ages Offspring

Prenatal Stress Ages Offspring

By | November 9, 2011

High stress during fetal development could  cause premature aging, according to a study in chickens, which published today (November 9) in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 

6 Comments

image: Q&A: Aging Geniuses

Q&A: Aging Geniuses

By | November 8, 2011

A new study shows that over the past century, the age at which scientists produce their most valuable work is increasing.

39 Comments

image: Old Cells Advance Aging

Old Cells Advance Aging

By | November 2, 2011

By selectively killing senescent cells, researchers can slow the decline of health in aging mice.

6 Comments

image: Bacterial Rejuvenation

Bacterial Rejuvenation

By | October 27, 2011

Bacteria age, but as a lineage, can live forever.

6 Comments

image: How Longevity Is Passed On

How Longevity Is Passed On

By | October 19, 2011

For the first time researchers have shown that epigenetic changes that increase lifespan can be inherited across multiple generations.

18 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 17, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

3 Comments

image: Neuroscience

Neuroscience

By | October 1, 2011

Read about beginnings of neuroscience through the eyes of Nobel Prize winner Eric Kandel, and how researchers today envision the future of the field.

0 Comments

image: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

By | October 1, 2011

Researchers studying differences in how individuals respond to stress are finding that genes are malleable and environments can be deterministic.

12 Comments

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