The Scientist

» aging and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

0 Comments

image: Flavanols Could Mend Powers of Memory

Flavanols Could Mend Powers of Memory

By | October 27, 2014

In a small study, 50-to-69-year-olds performed better on a pattern recognition test after drinking antioxidants found in cocoa.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: October 6–10

Week in Review: October 6–10

By | October 10, 2014

Nobel Prizes awarded; transgenerational effects of mitochondrial mutations; fat-targeted gene knockdown; Ebola updates in Spain and U.S.

0 Comments

image: Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

By | October 9, 2014

Mitochondrial mutations inherited from the mother can shorten a mouse’s lifespan.

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Aged Wisdom

Aged Wisdom

By | August 1, 2014

Supercentenarian Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper appeared on CNN in 2009, before donating her body to science and yielding insights into her remarkable longevity.

0 Comments

image: In Old Blood

In Old Blood

By | August 1, 2014

The body of a supercentenarian expands science’s appreciation for the physiological limits of aging.

3 Comments

image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS