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image: Aged Wisdom

Aged Wisdom

By | August 1, 2014

Supercentenarian Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper appeared on CNN in 2009, before donating her body to science and yielding insights into her remarkable longevity.

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image: In Old Blood

In Old Blood

By | August 1, 2014

The body of a supercentenarian expands science’s appreciation for the physiological limits of aging.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Week in Review: May 19–23

Week in Review: May 19–23

By | May 23, 2014

Sperm-sex–sensing sows; blocking a pain receptor extends lifespan in mice; stop codons can code for amino acids; exploring the tumor exome

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image: No Pain, Big Gain

No Pain, Big Gain

By | May 22, 2014

Eliminating a pain receptor makes mice live longer and keeps their metabolisms young.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, May 9

The Scientist on The Pulse, May 9

By | May 9, 2014

The rejuvenating effects of young blood, white nose syndrome spread, and penguin flu

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image: Blood Protein as Youth Rejuvenator

Blood Protein as Youth Rejuvenator

By | May 6, 2014

Researchers identify a component of young mouse blood that can help repair damaged brains and muscles in older mice.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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