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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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image: Opinion: Aging, Not a Disease

Opinion: Aging, Not a Disease

By | December 23, 2016

A response to “Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease” 

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image: RNA Pathway Helps Keep Flies Alive

RNA Pathway Helps Keep Flies Alive

By | December 22, 2016

An anti-transposon pathway previously thought to function only in reproductive tissue also helps reduce harmful mutations in body cells of fruit flies.

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image: Study: Aging May Be Reversible In Mice

Study: Aging May Be Reversible In Mice

By | December 19, 2016

By tweaking four transcription factors that convert differentiated cells into pluripotent precursors, researchers report having reversed aging in mice. 

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image: Controlled Splicing Extends Life Span in Roundworms

Controlled Splicing Extends Life Span in Roundworms

By | December 7, 2016

Increasing the expression of an RNA splicing factor mimics dietary restriction, prolonging life in nematodes. 

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image: Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

By | December 2, 2016

The human lymph nodes and spleen maintain unique, compartmentalized sets of naive T cells well into old age.

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image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

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