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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Delayed Turnover

Delayed Turnover

By | July 21, 2015

Aggregate-forming amyloid β proteins are replenished more slowly with age, and this may contribute to a person's risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

By | July 14, 2015

Calorie restriction in the organism extends lifespan, supporting a long-standing view that had been challenged by a study published last year.

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image: Periodic Fasting Improves Rodent Health

Periodic Fasting Improves Rodent Health

By | June 18, 2015

And a diet that includes a few days of caloric restriction each month reduces biomarkers of aging and disease in people, according to a small trial.

2 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Studies Conflict on Regenerative Molecule

Studies Conflict on Regenerative Molecule

By | May 19, 2015

Previously shown to boost muscle growth in aged mice, a protein’s role in regeneration just got more complicated.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

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