Advertisement
Horizon Discovery
Horizon Discovery

The Scientist

» aging and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Why Women Outlive Men

Why Women Outlive Men

By | August 3, 2012

Mitochondria mutations that affect male, but not female, aging could explain why women tend to live longer than men.

6 Comments

image: Anti-aging Pill Challenged

Anti-aging Pill Challenged

By | July 31, 2012

Former biotech executive files lawsuit accusing the company of engaging in deceptive business practices.

2 Comments

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

0 Comments

image: DNA Methylation Linked to Memory Loss

DNA Methylation Linked to Memory Loss

By | July 2, 2012

Scientists find that declining DNA methylation in mouse neurons may cause age-related memory deficits.

5 Comments

image: Older Dads Have Healthier Kids?

Older Dads Have Healthier Kids?

By | June 11, 2012

New research finds that older men have children and grandchildren with longer telomeres, possibly pointing to health benefits of delayed reproduction.

4 Comments

image: DNA Methylation Declines with Age

DNA Methylation Declines with Age

By | June 11, 2012

Newborns carry more epigenetic markers than nonagenarians, providing clues to the mechanisms underlying aging.

7 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

image: Underground Supermodels

Underground Supermodels

By | June 1, 2012

What can a twentysomething naked mole-rat tell us about fighting pain, cancer, and aging?

12 Comments

image: The Aging and Inflammation Link

The Aging and Inflammation Link

By | May 24, 2012

A protein that keeps the immune response in check leads a double life as an anti-aging factor.

4 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
LI-COR
LI-COR
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist