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image: An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

By | April 21, 2017

Scientists predict rodents’ ages by assessing DNA methylation markers in various tissues.

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A protein found in human umbilical cord plasma improves synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory in aged mice.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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image: Image of the Day: Senior Scientists

Image of the Day: Senior Scientists

By | March 28, 2017

The aging science and engineering workforce in the U.S. can be traced back to the Baby Boomer cohort of researchers and the elimination of mandatory retirement in universities.

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image: An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock

An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock

By | February 21, 2017

Stress-related genes may be preferentially and rhythmically expressed as part of the circadian rhythms of older fruit flies, researchers report.  

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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