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» aging and ecology

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Like New Again

By | November 11, 2013

Scientists show that reactivation of an RNA-binding protein in damaged adult tissues can lead to improved regeneration.

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Waste-Management Consultant

By | November 1, 2013

By audaciously pursuing an abandoned area of research, Ana María Cuervo discovered how cells selectively break down their waste, and revealed the health consequences when that process malfunctions.

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image: Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

By | October 29, 2013

New evidence indicates that invasive Asian carp have bred in the Lake Erie basin.

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Cloud-Based Genomics

By | October 28, 2013

An academic-commercial partnership launches the largest cloud-based genomics project to date.

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image: EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

By | October 25, 2013

The European Parliament rejected a proposal designed to fund the construction of new fishing boats, instead opting to fund a project that aims to curtail overfishing.

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Clocking Epigenetics

By | October 22, 2013

DNA methylation status can predict age in various human tissues, a study shows.

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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

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Beauty, Science-Deep

By | September 1, 2013

Cosmetics companies use advanced genomics and in vitro technology to make skin look young and vibrant—you may never view the makeup aisle the same way again.

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image: Dying Worms Emit Ethereal Glow

Dying Worms Emit Ethereal Glow

By | July 24, 2013

A head-to-tail wave of blue fluorescence signals the death of a nematode worm.

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image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

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