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image: Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

By | March 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Huffington Center On Aging, Baylor College of Medicine. Age: 38

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image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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image: Nourishing the Aging Brain

Nourishing the Aging Brain

By | March 1, 2015

Research reveals how the brain changes as we age and hints at ways to slow the decline.

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image: Wrangling Retrotransposons

Wrangling Retrotransposons

By , , and | March 1, 2015

These mobile genetic elements can wreak havoc on the genome. Researchers are now trying to understand how such activity contributes to the aging process.

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image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

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image: Marine Life Trending Larger

Marine Life Trending Larger

By | February 23, 2015

Ocean animals have been getting bigger over the millennia, according to an analysis of thousands of genera that have plied Earth’s seas since the Cambrian Period.

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image: ROS Can Shorten or Lengthen Life

ROS Can Shorten or Lengthen Life

By | February 13, 2015

Reactive oxygen species have opposing effects on roundworm longevity depending on whether these molecules are in the mitochondria or the cytoplasm.

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image: Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

By | February 13, 2015

Researchers working in China have unearthed the fossil remains of two diminutive mammals that speak volumes about faunal diversity during the Jurassic Period.

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image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

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image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

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