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image: Long Live Collagen

Long Live Collagen

By | March 1, 2015

Increased collagen expression is a common feature of many different pathways to extended longevity in worms.

3 Comments

image: Of Cells and Limits

Of Cells and Limits

By | March 1, 2015

Leonard Hayflick has been unafraid to speak his mind, whether it is to upend a well-entrenched dogma or to challenge the federal government. At 86, he’s nowhere near retirement.

3 Comments

image: Quantity or Quality?

Quantity or Quality?

By | March 1, 2015

Living longer doesn’t necessarily mean living healthier.

1 Comment

image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

1 Comment

image: Rethinking Telomeres

Rethinking Telomeres

By | March 1, 2015

Not only do telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes, they also modulate gene expression over cells’ lifetimes.

2 Comments

image: Sharing Longevity Data

Sharing Longevity Data

By | March 1, 2015

Aging research would greatly benefit from consistently making annotated life span data available.

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image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2015

March 2015's selection of notable quotes

3 Comments

image: Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

By | March 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Huffington Center On Aging, Baylor College of Medicine. Age: 38

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image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

2 Comments

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