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image: “Yeti” Just a Himalayan Bear?

“Yeti” Just a Himalayan Bear?

By | March 17, 2015

Latest analysis suggests the yeti is a known bear species, not the new, hybrid species suggested by a previous study.

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image: 23andMe Enters Drug Development

23andMe Enters Drug Development

By | March 12, 2015

The personal genomics firm announces plans to make medicines.

4 Comments

image: Horizontal Gene Transfer a Hallmark of Animal Genomes?

Horizontal Gene Transfer a Hallmark of Animal Genomes?

By | March 12, 2015

Foreign genes in animal genomes may be of bacterial or fungal origin, according to a new analysis.

4 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 4, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Age-Old Questions

Age-Old Questions

By | March 1, 2015

How do we age, and can we slow it down?

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image: As the Brain Ages

As the Brain Ages

By | March 1, 2015

See human brains age in week-by-week time lapse images that divulge the existence of tiny strokes that damage white matter.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Growth Hormone Guidance

Growth Hormone Guidance

By | March 1, 2015

Intact growth hormone signaling pathways are needed for methionine restriction to extend mouse lifespan.

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image: Long Live Collagen

Long Live Collagen

By | March 1, 2015

Increased collagen expression is a common feature of many different pathways to extended longevity in worms.

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image: Of Cells and Limits

Of Cells and Limits

By | March 1, 2015

Leonard Hayflick has been unafraid to speak his mind, whether it is to upend a well-entrenched dogma or to challenge the federal government. At 86, he’s nowhere near retirement.

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