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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Male and Female Brains Wired Differently

Male and Female Brains Wired Differently

By | December 4, 2013

The brains of men contain stronger front-to-rear connections while those of women are better connected from left to right.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Get Off the Pot

Get Off the Pot

By | October 15, 2013

Researchers demonstrate the successful treatment of marijuana abuse in rats and monkeys.

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image: Placebo’s Double Whammy

Placebo’s Double Whammy

By | October 14, 2013

Sham treatments can both reduce pain and increase pleasure, and do so affecting similar circuitry in the brain.

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image: Brain Circuit Toggles Eating

Brain Circuit Toggles Eating

By | September 26, 2013

A network of neurons in the hypothalamus can turn feeding behavior on or off with the flip of an optogenetic switch in mice.  

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image: Preliminary BRAIN Plans

Preliminary BRAIN Plans

By | September 18, 2013

An NIH working group lays out nine research areas the new federal neuroscience initiative will fund.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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