The Scientist

» brain-machine interface

Most Recent

image: Monkey Mind Control

Monkey Mind Control

By | February 19, 2014

The brain activity of one monkey dictated movements of a second, sedated animal, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Monkey-Machine Interface

Monkey-Machine Interface

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers have shown that rhesus monkeys can control the movements of two virtual avatar arms simultaneously.

0 Comments

image: Learning to Use Brain-Computer Interfaces

Learning to Use Brain-Computer Interfaces

By | June 10, 2013

Controlling computers with the mind and learning motor skills rely on a similar set of brain regions.

1 Comment

image: Robot Legs Obey Brain

Robot Legs Obey Brain

By | September 7, 2012

A pair of mechanical leg braces that are controlled by their wearer’s brain signals could help paralyzed patients walk again.

1 Comment

image: Missing Touch

Missing Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Bionic fingers. Rewired nerves. Science fiction becomes reality as scientists attempt to give prosthetics a sense of touch.

2 Comments

image: Robo Touch

Robo Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Because of a lack of touch, upper-limb prosthetic users must look at their prosthetic hands the whole time they use them. Unfortunately, the prosthetics research community has put most of its efforts into making arms with wider ranges of motion and m

0 Comments

image: The Ultimate Social Data

The Ultimate Social Data

By | July 26, 2012

Facebook is considering allowing scientists to evaluate its user data without breaching its privacy policies.

2 Comments

image: Size Does Matter

Size Does Matter

By | June 22, 2012

Researchers have discovered how the brain broadly characterizes objects by size, revealing a fundamental insight into how we interact with the world.

1 Comment

image: Brain Controls Paralyzed Muscles

Brain Controls Paralyzed Muscles

By | April 18, 2012

A new system decodes brain signals from the motor cortex of monkeys and translates them into basic arm movements, despite temporary paralysis.

2 Comments

image: A Not-So-Short Circuit?

A Not-So-Short Circuit?

By | October 1, 2011

As neuroscientists look to the future of their field, they are beginning to delve into more complex factors that define our emotions and intentions.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Exercise Boosts Telomere Transcription
  2. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
  3. Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised
  4. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
RayBiotech