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image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.

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image: Fish Brain on Film

Fish Brain on Film

By | March 19, 2013

Improvements in light-sheet microscopy enable real-time activity imaging of almost every neuron in the brain of zebrafish larvae.

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image: Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

By | March 17, 2013

Researchers find remarkably active bacteria in the Mariana Trench, where they live under pressure 1,000 times greater than at the surface.

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image: Life Below the Seabed

Life Below the Seabed

By | March 14, 2013

Rock samples from deep within the Earth’s oceanic crust contain chemosynthetic microbial life.

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image: Roller Derby Players Share Germs

Roller Derby Players Share Germs

By | March 14, 2013

Team member and opponents exchange microbes by slamming into each others’ shoulders during the game.

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

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image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

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image: Mice Learn Faster with Human Glia

Mice Learn Faster with Human Glia

By | March 7, 2013

Mice with human brain cells showed enhanced synaptic plasticity and learning, suggesting glia may be key to our cognitive prowess.  

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image: Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

By | March 6, 2013

The nanoscale structure of a clanger cicada’s wings destroys threatening microbes on contact.

2 Comments

image: Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

By | March 3, 2013

Normal proteins with regions resembling disease-causing prions are responsible for an inherited disorder that affects the brain, muscle, and bone.

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