The Scientist

» neuroscience, culture, immunology and ecology

Most Recent

image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

0 Comments

image: Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

By | June 14, 2017

The brains of Polistes paper wasps express different genes when identifying faces than when distinguishing between simple patterns, a study finds.

1 Comment

Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

0 Comments

image: Distinguished Autism Researcher Dies

Distinguished Autism Researcher Dies

By | June 13, 2017

A child neurologist, Isabelle Rapin popularized the notion that autism was part of a spectrum of disorders.

0 Comments

image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Memory Maker

Image of the Day: Memory Maker

By | June 2, 2017

The enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 turns on memory-building genes within the nuclei of hippocampal neurons. 

0 Comments

image: Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

By | June 1, 2017

Researchers could reconstruct the faces a monkey saw from the patterns of neuronal activity in a certain area of the brain.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS