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image: Neural Stem Cells Sprout Long Axons

Neural Stem Cells Sprout Long Axons

By | August 7, 2014

Early neurons reprogrammed from human skin cells show unprecedented axonal growth in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

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image: How Tinier Theropods Took Flight

How Tinier Theropods Took Flight

By | August 4, 2014

Downsizing dinosaurs was key to the evolution of birds, a study shows. 

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image: Cephalopod Coddling

Cephalopod Coddling

By | August 1, 2014

Deep-sea octopus has the longest-known brooding period known for any animal species.

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image: Beyond Cat Killing

Beyond Cat Killing

By | August 1, 2014

Capsule reviewed author Ian Leslie sets up his latest book, Curious, about the human propensity to wonder and learn.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Shocked</em>

Book Excerpt from Shocked

By | August 1, 2014

In Chapter 4, “Science fiction, space travel, and the strange science of suspended animation,” author David Casarett describes his brush with adenosine monophosphate and reanimated mice.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2014

The Myth of Mirror Neurons, Curious, Shadow Medicine, and Doctored

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image: Connecting the Dots

Connecting the Dots

By | August 1, 2014

Extending her initial studies of social wasps, Mary Jane West-Eberhard has spent her career probing the evolutionary relationship between social behavior and developmental flexibility.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Science Speak

Science Speak

By | August 1, 2014

Contests that challenge young scientists to explain their research without jargon are turning science communication into a competitive sport.

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image: Seeds of Hopelessness

Seeds of Hopelessness

By | August 1, 2014

Can seed banks adequately prepare for the future if wild plant populations are already lagging behind in adapting to rapid climate change?

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