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image: Cerebral Sleuths

Cerebral Sleuths

By | November 1, 2014

For neuroscientists, experimental results converge to help crack the case of how the brain functions.

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Enhanced Enhancers

Enhanced Enhancers

By | November 1, 2014

The recent discovery of super-enhancers may offer new drug targets for a range of diseases.

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image: Light-Operated Drugs

Light-Operated Drugs

By | November 1, 2014

Scientists create a photosensitive pharmaceutical to target a glutamate receptor.

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Mind, Powered

By | November 1, 2014

Neuroscientist Eric talks about the science and technology behind brain-computer interfaces.

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image: Mitochondria Munchers

Mitochondria Munchers

By | November 1, 2014

Glial cells consume mitochondria released by neurons in the optic nerve.

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image: Mixed Signals

Mixed Signals

By | November 1, 2014

Individual neurons in the dorsomedial striatum integrate responses to sight and touch.

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image: Mouse Traps

Mouse Traps

By | November 1, 2014

How to avoid pitfalls in assays of mouse behavior

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Rhythmic Rewiring

Rhythmic Rewiring

By | November 1, 2014

Circadian neurons in fruit flies form synapses with different, noncircadian brain regions depending on the time of day.

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