The Scientist

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image: Monkey-Machine Interface

Monkey-Machine Interface

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers have shown that rhesus monkeys can control the movements of two virtual avatar arms simultaneously.

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image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

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image: Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

By | November 6, 2013

Researchers show that the prevalence of one genus of bacteria correlates with the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | November 1, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | November 1, 2013

A rare bleeding disorder leads scientists to uncover an unusual blood component that might be common to us all.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2013

Tracks and Shadows, The Gap, The Cure in the Code, and An Appetite for Wonder

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Cortex Tour

Cortex Tour

By | November 1, 2013

Travel through the outer layers of a mouse brain thanks to array tomography and Stanford University's Stephen Smith.

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image: Dating the Origin of Us

Dating the Origin of Us

By | November 1, 2013

Theoretical anthropogeny seeks to understand how Homo sapiens rose to a position of global dominance.

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image: Exploring the Neuron Forest

Exploring the Neuron Forest

By | November 1, 2013

Innovations in imaging techniques and genetic sequencing take neuroscience to a new level.

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