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Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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A Different Way of Doing Things

By | April 1, 2016

Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolic processes that may serve as promising targets for new therapies.

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image: Metabolic Reprogramming

Metabolic Reprogramming

By | April 1, 2016

How cancer cells fuel their rapid growth

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image: The Forces of Cancer

The Forces of Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

A tumor’s physical environment fuels its growth and causes treatment resistance.

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Under Pressure

By | April 1, 2016

The causes and consequences of physical forces in the tumor microenvironment

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image: Simplified Magnetogenetics

Simplified Magnetogenetics

By | March 25, 2016

A new technique allows researchers to rapidly and reversibly activate neurons with a magnetically sensitive protein.

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image: Recovering Lost Memories

Recovering Lost Memories

By | March 21, 2016

Researchers use optogenetics to induce recall in an Alzheimer’s mouse model, suggesting the disease may not destroy memories permanently.

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