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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus


image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.


image: Schizophrenia’s Intricacies

Schizophrenia’s Intricacies

By | January 23, 2014

Two studies provide insight into the genetics of the disorder and show again how complex it is.


image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.


image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.


image: The Shared Perfumes of Queens

The Shared Perfumes of Queens

By | January 16, 2014

Ant, bee, and wasp queens emit a similar class of pheromones that sterilize their workers, hinting at a shared ancestry for these chemicals.

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image: Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

By | January 16, 2014

A pair of one-act chamber operas takes the audience inside the world of imagined sound. 


image: New Neuroscience Journal to Launch

New Neuroscience Journal to Launch

By | January 15, 2014

The publisher of The Journal of Neuroscience has laid out plans for an open-access, online-only journal for brain research.

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image: Clocks Versus Rocks

Clocks Versus Rocks

By | January 14, 2014

A new analysis suggests that placental mammals originated while dinosaurs were dominant, contradicting a recent high-profile study.


image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.


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