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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Beast from the East

A Beast from the East

By | December 2, 2015

Researchers unearth a dog-size, horned dinosaur from eastern North America, whose features suggest evolutionary isolation from western dinos.

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image: Repositioning Ctenophores

Repositioning Ctenophores

By | December 1, 2015

A reanalysis of phylogenetic data places sponges, rather than comb jellies, back at the base of the animal tree.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

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image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

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image: Pumpkins Saved By People?

Pumpkins Saved By People?

By | November 25, 2015

Domestication may have saved pumpkins, gourds, and squash as seed dispersers like the mastodon went extinct. 

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image: Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

By | November 24, 2015

New clues from ancient DNA reveal the remarkable effect of agriculture on adaptation in Stone Age humans who lived across Europe.

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image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

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