The Scientist

» neuroscience and genetics & genomics

Most Recent

image: Brain Prize Winners Announced

Brain Prize Winners Announced

By | March 3, 2016

Three UK neuroscientists jointly win the €1 million European Brain Prize for their work on memory.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

0 Comments

image: Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

By | March 1, 2016

Research Fellow, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège. Age: 35

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Dial It Up, Dial It Down

Dial It Up, Dial It Down

By | March 1, 2016

Newer CRISPR tools for manipulating transcription will help unlock noncoding RNA’s many roles.

0 Comments

image: In Your Dreams

In Your Dreams

By | March 1, 2016

Understanding the sleeping brain may be the key to unlocking the secrets of the human mind.

1 Comment

image: Learning with the Lights Out

Learning with the Lights Out

By | March 1, 2016

Researchers are uncovering the link between sleep and learning and how it changes throughout our lives.

1 Comment

image: Out in the Cold

Out in the Cold

By | March 1, 2016

Serotonin’s long-debated role in sleep promotion is temperature-dependent.

1 Comment

image: Sleep Circuit

Sleep Circuit

By | March 1, 2016

A web of cell types in one of the brain’s chief wake centers keeps animals up—but also puts them to sleep.

0 Comments

image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  4. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
AAAS