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image: For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

By | July 1, 2011

Eleanor Simpson on how dopamine helps rats learn and may lead humans to addiction.

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image: Best in Academia, 2011

Best in Academia, 2011

By | July 1, 2011

Meet some of the finalists of this year's Best Places to Work in Academia survey. 

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image: Foresight

Foresight

By | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

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image: Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

By | July 1, 2011

This animation illustrates optogenetics—a radical new technology for controlling brain activity with light. 

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image: Sleep on it

Sleep on it

By | June 23, 2011

Scientists invent a method to control the timing and duration of sleep in fruit flies and find that snoozing helps form long-term memories.

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image: Summit Science

Summit Science

By | June 20, 2011

Researchers seeking a link between vision problems and the dangerous physiological effects of hypoxia in mountain climbers are taking their work to new heights.

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image: Head trauma in the funny pages

Head trauma in the funny pages

By | June 17, 2011

Researchers are using real-world methods to study traumatic brain injuries in a comic book.

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image: Stress births neural stem cells

Stress births neural stem cells

By | June 15, 2011

When mice are held in isolation, stem cells in the hippocampus make more of themselves and wait for better times.

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image: 2011 World Science Festival: A look back

2011 World Science Festival: A look back

By | June 10, 2011

The Scientist covered some of the events that made this year's festival memorable.

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image: The rhythm of biology

The rhythm of biology

By | June 3, 2011

An art exhibit in New York City explores the science behind our reaction to sounds and sensations.

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