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image: Bacterial Sacrifice

Bacterial Sacrifice

By | January 1, 2013

Patterns of cell death aid in the formation of beneficial wrinkles during the development of bacterial biofilms.

1 Comment

image: Cleansing the Clinic

Cleansing the Clinic

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists set up a stakeout to track the movements of microbes around a new hospital.

2 Comments

image: Fast Worms

Fast Worms

By | January 1, 2013

A microfluidic device scans individual C. elegans for abnormal traits and sorts wild-type animals from mutants.

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image: Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Fighting Microbes with Microbes

By | January 1, 2013

Doctors turn to good microbes to fight disease. Will the same strategy work with crops?

6 Comments

image: Staying in Touch

Staying in Touch

By | January 1, 2013

Searching for life beyond our teeming planet has led to some innovative collaborative approaches to generating knowledge right here at home.

1 Comment

image: Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics

Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics

By | December 10, 2012

Long-term exposure to antibiotics from agricultural run off may encourage the evolution of soil bacteria that break down and consume the antibacterial agents.

1 Comment

image: Microchannel Masterpiece

Microchannel Masterpiece

By | December 1, 2012

A precision microfluidic system enables single-cell analysis of growth and division.

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image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

1 Comment

image: Top 10 Innovations 2012

Top 10 Innovations 2012

By | December 1, 2012

The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.

5 Comments

image: Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

By | November 28, 2012

In the largest microbial eukaryote genetic sequencing effort ever attempted, researchers are investigating the transcriptomes of 700 marine algae species.

1 Comment

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