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Molecular Neuroscientist Dies

By | August 11, 2014

Stephen Heinemann, who along with his colleagues identified the genes encoding the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain, has passed away at age 75.

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image: Neural Stem Cells Sprout Long Axons

Neural Stem Cells Sprout Long Axons

By | August 7, 2014

Early neurons reprogrammed from human skin cells show unprecedented axonal growth in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

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Beyond Cat Killing

By | August 1, 2014

Capsule reviewed author Ian Leslie sets up his latest book, Curious, about the human propensity to wonder and learn.

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Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2014

The Myth of Mirror Neurons, Curious, Shadow Medicine, and Doctored

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Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

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Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2014

August 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine

By , , and | August 1, 2014

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.

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image: Zebrafish Brain in Action

Zebrafish Brain in Action

By | July 28, 2014

Researchers use light-sheet microscopy to map central nervous system activity in zebrafish larvae.

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Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

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image: Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

By | July 23, 2014

A former graduate student says he feels slighted by a failure to attribute his contributions to a line of research regarding the salinity tolerances of an invasive species.

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