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image: Week in Review: December 16–20

Week in Review: December 16–20

By | December 20, 2013

Sex lives of early hominins; Amborella trichopoda genome; surface topography and stem cells; how HIV weakens immune cells; dogs, dust microbes, and mouse allergies; news from ASCB

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image: Understanding Lyme

Understanding Lyme

By | December 19, 2013

Researchers show that a protein expressed in the bacterium that causes Lyme disease is necessary for both parts of the organism’s life cycle.

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image: On The Origin of Flowers

On The Origin of Flowers

By | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

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image: NIH Calls for BRAIN Proposals

NIH Calls for BRAIN Proposals

By | December 19, 2013

The National Institutes of Health has outlined the types of projects it intends to fund through the federal BRAIN Initiative, and is requesting applications.

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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

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image: Enzyme Checks Neuronal Growth

Enzyme Checks Neuronal Growth

By | December 17, 2013

A microtubule-severing enzyme curbs the regeneration of damaged nerve cells.

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image: Test Scores Are in the Genes

Test Scores Are in the Genes

By | December 16, 2013

More than school or family environment, a child’s genetics influences high school exam results.

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image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

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image: Week in Review: December 9–13

Week in Review: December 9–13

By | December 13, 2013

Animal family tree rearranged; how E. coli evades the immune system; pharmacological chaperones and misfolded proteins

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image: The Right to Know—or Not

The Right to Know—or Not

By | December 12, 2013

Consumers, patients, and study participants should be made aware of potential incidental findings, according to a federally-appointed bioethics panel.

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