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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2012

May 2012's selection of notable quotes

8 Comments

image: The Sound of Color

The Sound of Color

By | May 1, 2012

A completely colorblind musician and painter perceives the world in a new way with help from technology.

12 Comments

image: Are Humans Still Evolving?

Are Humans Still Evolving?

By | April 30, 2012

Research on an 18th and 19th century Finnish population suggests that agriculture and monogamy may not have stopped human evolution.

46 Comments

image: Anti-inflammatory Factors Fight Bugs

Anti-inflammatory Factors Fight Bugs

By | April 25, 2012

A combination of antibiotics and the body’s own defensive metabolites clears bacterial infections faster than antibiotics alone.

4 Comments

image: Polar Bear More Ancient Than Realized

Polar Bear More Ancient Than Realized

By | April 20, 2012

A genetic analysis reveals that the polar bear split from the brown bear some 600,000 years ago.

0 Comments

image: Synthetic Genetic Evolution

Synthetic Genetic Evolution

By | April 19, 2012

Scientists show that manmade nucleic acids can replicate and evolve, ushering in a new era in synthetic biology.

22 Comments

image: Genomics Boom Continues

Genomics Boom Continues

By | April 16, 2012

A new report estimates that the genomics research tools market will be worth nearly $9 billion by 2016.

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image: Anti-science in Tennessee Classrooms

Anti-science in Tennessee Classrooms

By | April 12, 2012

A new law opens the door to teaching creationism and climate change denialism in the state's public schools.

60 Comments

image: Social Rank Affects Monkey Immunity

Social Rank Affects Monkey Immunity

By | April 11, 2012

In rhesus macaques, an individual's drop in the social hierarchy leads to overactive immune genes and, possibly, poor health.

0 Comments

image: Insect Battles, Big and Small

Insect Battles, Big and Small

By | April 10, 2012

Social insect soldiers not only protect the colony from insect invasions; some also secrete strong antifungal compounds to kill microscopic enemies.

2 Comments

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