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Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Discovering Archaea, 1977

Discovering Archaea, 1977

By | March 1, 2014

Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Week in Review: February 10–14

Week in Review: February 10–14

By | February 14, 2014

First Ancient North American genome; cannabinoids connect hunger with olfaction and eating; biotechs explore crowdfunding; confronting creationism

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image: New <em>Science</em> Journal to Launch

New Science Journal to Launch

By | February 12, 2014

The American Association for the Advancement of Science, publisher of the journal Science, announces plans for a new digital open-access publication, Science Advances.

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image: Opinion: Confronting Creationism

Opinion: Confronting Creationism

By | February 7, 2014

Five reasons why scientists should stay out of debates over evolution.

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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