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image: Keeping immunity in check

Keeping immunity in check

By | June 16, 2011

Two newly discovered proteins that act as brakes to slow a plant's immune response after infection may provide clues to autoimmune treatments.

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image: Gould's bias

Gould's bias

By | June 16, 2011

A new study finds that Stephen J. Gould's criticisms of another scientist's data was misplaced, and the eminent biologist and historian succumbed to data bias himself.

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image: Our own 60 mutations

Our own 60 mutations

By | June 15, 2011

New estimates of human mutation suggest that each of us harbor approximately 60 novel genetic mutations.

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image: Fighting to exist

Fighting to exist

By | June 14, 2011

The more closely related two species are, the more they're apt to drive one another to extinction.

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image: One Hip Dino

One Hip Dino

By | June 13, 2011

University College London researcher Mike Taylor recounts the discovery of a new dinosaur with unusually powerful thigh muscles. Read the full story.

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image: How skunks got their stripes

How skunks got their stripes

By | June 7, 2011

The evolution of bold warning coloration in mammals.

3 Comments

image: Top 7 in vaccination

Top 7 in vaccination

By | June 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in vaccination and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

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image: Approaching Universality

Approaching Universality

By | June 5, 2011

Pitfalls and triumphs on the way to complete vaccine protection.

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In Chapter 9, "We Were Hunted, Which is Why All of Us are Afraid Some of the Time and Some of Us are Afraid All of the Time," author Rob Dunn explains how predators shaped our evolution as we cowered and ran from their ravenous maws.

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image: The Anatomy of a High

The Anatomy of a High

By | June 3, 2011

When someone snorts or smokes cocaine, which is composed of small crystalline alkaloid molecules, the drug enters the bloodstream and from there eventually crosses into the heart, brain, and other organs. 

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